twins birth story
Family Life

Twins Birth Story: I’m Back! Here’s How It All Went Down…

The day I delivered my babies is both completely blurry and seared indelibly into memory.

After a long, surreal lead-up to my scheduled c-section, there was nothing left to do but deliver some twins. On July 22, at 38 weeks, we were actually sleeping when the alarm sounded at 4 a.m. For the last time, I peeled my enormously pregnant body from the bed and got in the shower, following with my full hair and makeup routine. My husband, David, couldn’t understand why I would bother, but of course I knew 1) there would be pictures! And 2) it might be a very long time before I managed such a feat again.

For the last time as a family of two, we left the house with our bags packed. It was a warm, beautiful early morning, and we snapped a picture of the moon over our house. Minutes later, we arrived at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center where we had our pick of prime parking spaces at 5 a.m. — a dream for a Los Angeleno, and an auspicious beginning to a big day! I noticed a sign that advertised discounted parking at a weekly rate, and as I shuffled into the hospital, I asked the parking attendant how to get the weekly pass, which would save us $10 over the course of our four-day stay. David couldn’t believe I found the energy to focus on such a pursuit, but I reminded him that every dollar counts with two babies on the way! And I’m nothing if not a hustler for a great bargain.

We made our way inside to check in for labor and delivery, at the same desk we had seen on our maternity ward tour when the reality of this day seemed infinitely far off — as if it were actually on another planet instead of just weeks away. This time, it was we who were checking into the hospital to deliver babies, and it was still too enormous to process.

We met our wonderful nurse, Griselda, who would be with us for 14 hours that day. She got us all prepared, running my IV line and strapping on two fetal monitors, one in blue and one in pink. She’d be my guardian angel — among many — during our stay.

Eventually, it was off to the operating room, where TLC’s “No Scrubs” was playing; the anesthesiologist had apparently honored my preference for ’90s hip-hop when he selected the Pandora station. I remember registering the neat play on hospital scrubs as the terror set in. I was most worried about this part of the day: David would have to stay outside in the hall as the team administered my spinal. It was the only time we’d have to be separated. As I sat sideways on the operating table with my legs dangling and my back exposed, Griselda squeezed my hands as she leaned into me, forehead to forehead. I’ll always remember her caring support.

Soon, the anesthesia began to take effect, and I didn’t like the feeling one bit — the feeling that my body had vanished from the boobs down, and there was no guarantee I’d be able to feel it again. I panicked.

The team let David come in early, and they also ran Propofol into my IV for the anxiety. David used the tools in his tool box to calm me: He rattled off a list of words that corresponded to my favorite images and memories. “Our first dance… Bora Bora honeymoon… scuba diving Belize… the beach in Rio…” He named as many of my favorite things he could think of in the moment, before, owing to his own nerves, he just repeated the list.

I heard my obstetrician say, “We’re down to the uterus now,” but I was less concerned about the progress of the surgery and more eager to feel my body again. Soon, I heard the cry: My son was out in the world. David’s face was hovering just over mine, and though his mouth was covered with a green hospital mask, I could see that his eyes exploded with emotion. Our son.

Someone announced the weight: six pounds, six ounces. Then another cry and another weight: five pounds, 12 ounces. My daughter was on the outside too. Both were whisked to the other side of what felt like a very big room for their initial medical attention. I heard someone tell David, “…other than that, she’s great.” I called out to try to understand what that meant. It turned out my daughter’s body temperature was low, but she was quickly warmed up. And beyond that, they were perfect. I felt rhythmic tugging as the doc stitched me all up. And then someone (was it David?) brought the babies over to my chest so I could hold them for the first time, one nestled under each arm. We’re a family of four now — imagine that.

From the operating room, we moved to the post-op recovery room, where my parents came with pink and blue balloons and held the babes. We shared their names for the first time: Maya Zoe and Jordan Oscar. Jordan was platinum blonde like me at birth, and Maya had dark hair — something she got from her dad that I never expected. They were devastating in their sweetness, too precious for words. How improbable and magical that we actually made them and I carried them inside!

From there, we moved to what was supposed to be our room for the next four days. It turned out, we’d move again.

As the team of nurses was transferring me from the gurney to the hospital bed, I noticed a lot of blood. I said, “That’s normal, right…?” There was some focused silence and then a second nurse said to Griselda, “It’s just that I’ve never seen a clot that big.” Quickly, the babies vanished out of the room on their way to the nursery, and our tiny room filled with people. David said he counted nine in addition to us. One of the doctors was really young and I called him Doogie Howser. I was high on Propofol. And I was hemmorhaging: My uterus had been so distended from carrying 12 pounds and two ounces of baby to full term that, like an overstretched rubber band, it could not contract.

In another far-off era, or in another part of the world, that might have been the end of me. But with access to such quality health care and thanks to modern medicine, I didn’t worry about my mortality. I did however, feel anxious for the team to resolve the situation, and I thought the thermometer bouncing up and down in my mouth was a physical manifestation of my anxiety. In reality, I’d later learn, the shaking was just a standard side effect of narcotic drugs.

Griselda pressed repeatedly on my post-op stomach; it’s not the relaxing spa-like treatment I’d pictured when she’d said she was going to periodically “massage the uterus.” Doogie Howser administered a bunch of drugs including Pitocin. And within a few tense hours, my bleeding issue was resolved.

For the first night, we moved to an acute care wing of the hospital, instead of the standard labor and delivery ward, and the babies rejoined us, sleeping serenely most of that first day — hazy, as it was, for all of us. Apparently, my situation warranted some attention, with the head nurse coming to check on me as the first stop on her shift later that evening. I told her she was stunning and looked like Nia Long because I was still high on Morphine and Propofol, and was, apparently, without filters. (And because she was and did.)

Outside the window, I could see that night was finally falling on what was, without any question, the most intense and wondrous and magical day of my life: the day my twin miracles came into the world.

This story originally appeared on Parents.com.

You Might Also Like...

Previous Post Next Post

You Might Also Like

10 Comments

  • Reply Nina September 26, 2014 at 3:09 pm

    Oh my gosh—this brought back so many memories! I’m from LA too and gave birth at Cedars. Agree—top notch care there. I didn’t have a C-section with the twins; I gave birth vaginally and thankfully no complications! But like you, the next day, I had a TON of blood, and just like your situation, it went from me just wanting to go pee, to the nurse noticing a lot of blood, to the room filled with 10 people as they had to remove blood cloths. I swear, that was more painful than the delivery.

    But wow your babies are huge! Good job mama! Mine were smaller but thankfully we went home with them because they “passed all the tests” lol.

    Congratulations to you and your fam!

  • Reply How to Style Curly Hair: You Asked For It! April 22, 2015 at 8:10 pm

    […] it! Let it air dry and you’re done — seriously easy. I used to diffuse religiously. When I had my twins in July, I figured I’d just let my hair air dry until we got passed the hectic first few […]

  • Reply Need a Mother's Day Gift for Pregnant Wife? Friend? Yourself?! 9 Ideas Here... May 1, 2015 at 4:38 pm

    […] Doll. It’s a silly stress reliever during pregnancy (throw it at the wall!) or as a delivery bag […]

  • Reply 3 Fun Things in Honor of Mother's Day (Including a Fab Giveaway for One Lucky Mama!) May 8, 2015 at 7:17 pm

    […] I’ve been a mama for nine months, meaning those twin babes have been on the outside now for as long as they were […]

  • Reply Hiking Runyon Canyon With a Stroller: Yes You Can! May 12, 2015 at 10:13 pm

    […] my twins, I have been dreaming of stroller hiking with the babes. Yesterday, nine months since they were born, we did it at […]

  • Reply Twins' First Holiday! 5 Things I Learned About Taking Babies to Hotels May 26, 2015 at 7:33 pm

    […] it comes to travel, I’ve written here about our firsts as new parents since the twins were born: my first business trip at 12 weeks postpartum, our first couples’ driving trip away without […]

  • Reply Luxury Romantic Travel: Bidding Adiós to Bebés for a Punta Mita Getaway June 11, 2015 at 3:03 am

    […] going to tell you straight up. It’s when you have seven-month-old twins, and you’re getting on a plane for a getaway without them for the first time since they were […]

  • Reply Bingo! The Best Advice for Flying With a Baby Is Right Here July 2, 2015 at 7:25 pm

    […] noticed there’s one travel-related “first” I haven’t yet done since the twins were born: I haven’t brought the babes on a plane. I probably don’t need to tell you why this is […]

  • Reply 10 Things Parents of Multiples Just Can't Do (but Parents of Singles Can!) July 16, 2015 at 2:05 pm

    […] just don’t know how you do it!” As a new mom to nearly one-year-old twins, I get that a lot. Frankly, it’s a reasonable thing to say, coming from parents managing one […]

  • Reply Yes, I Got a Push Present — and I Deserved It! August 20, 2015 at 8:41 pm

    […] part of all the swirling preparations last year, I got something like a push present (even though we need to stop calling it that — but […]

  • Leave a Reply

    You\'re a human being, right? *